Go to navigation (press enter key)

News

Peter Andreas discusses the 1992-95 battle for Sarajevo on November 3, 2009.

 

POUGHKEEPSIE, NY-Peter Andreas, director of the international studies program and associate professor of political science at Brown University, will examine the 1992-95 battle for Sarajevo on Tuesday, November 3. The lecture, free and open to the public, will be based upon the topic of Andreas's recent book Blue Helmets and Black Markets: The Business of Survival in the Siege of Sarajevo and will begin at 5:00pm in Rockefeller Hall, Room 300. A question-and-answer session will follow the presentation.

Blue Helmets and Black Markets: The Business of Survival in the Siege of Sarajevo (Cornell University Press, 2008) examines the 1992-95 battle for Sarajevo, the longest siege in modern history. At the heart of intense media attention, the battle for Sarajevo became the focus of the international eye, and a reminder of post-Cold War realities. Aid workers, UN peacekeepers, and journalists flocked to the scene. But the siege of Sarajevo was also the nexus of smugglers, thieves, and secretive trading in the black market, which peacekeeping forces did little to stop.

Andreas links the formal front-stage and informal backstage activities that occurred during the siege of Sarajevo, arguing that international intervention-humanitarian and otherwise-prolonged the conflict and gave birth to a criminalized war economy after the siege. He draws upon extensive documentation, including diaries, photos and reportage to give a glimpse of the daily life of Sarajevo residents during the siege.

Agnieszka Paczynska, of the Institute for Conflict Analysis and Resolution, praised Blue Helmets and Black Markets: The Business of Survival in the Siege of Sarajevo as a "provocative study." She noted that, "Andreas argues that the example of Sarajevo strongly suggests that uncovering the hidden dynamics of war economies is important because their legacies outlast a conflict's end and continue to shape post-conflict reconstruction. Highly recommended."

This lecture event is sponsored by the Department of Political Science.

ABOUT PETER ANDREAS:
Peter Andreas is associate professor of Political Science and International Studies at the Watson Institute for International Studies in Brown University. He is also director of the International Relations Program.

Previously, Andreas was an academy scholar at Harvard University, a research fellow at the Brookings Institution, and an SSRC-MacArthur Foundation Fellow on International Peace and Security. He holds an MA and PhD in government from Cornell University and a BA in political science from Swarthmore College.

Andreas is the author, co-author, or co-editor of seven books, in addition to Blue Helmets and Black Markets, these include: Policing the Globe: Criminalization and Crime Control in International Relations, and Border Games: Policing the U.S.-Mexico. His forthcoming book from Cornell University Press is Sex, Drugs, and Body Counts: The Politics of Numbers in Global Crime and Conflict (2010). He has also written for a wide range of scholarly and policy publications, including International Security, International Studies Quarterly, Review of International Political Economy, Foreign Policy, New Republic, and The Nation. Other writings include congressional testimonies and op-eds in national newspapers.

He is currently researching and writing a book on the politics of smuggling in American history, tentatively titled Smuggler Nation: How Illicit Trade Made America (under contract with Oxford University Press).

Individuals with disabilities requiring accommodations or information on accessibility should contact Campus Activities Office at (845) 437-5370. Without sufficient notice, appropriate space and/or assistance may not be available. Directions to the Vassar campus are available online at www.vassar.edu/directions.

Vassar College is a highly selective, coeducational, independent, residential liberal arts college founded in 1861.

Posted by Office of Communications Tuesday, October 20, 2009